Partnering with Parents to Create a Lifetime of Healthy Dental Habits

Frenectomy Waterlase Laser

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgically releasing the frenum is called frenectomy. Conventional treatment involved a procedure where the frenum was cut with a blade or scissors, with or without sutures to reposition its attachment. In our office, we employ a procedure called laser frenectomy in which the Waterlase is used to zap the frenum with laser pulses without even touching it, gently severing it from its attachment.

 

A few drops of anesthetic makes the area numb. Healing time is reduced drastically, as the Waterlase does not create tissue trauma or charring, as some older lasers did. The actual procedure takes 3-5 minutes, and full healing with new skin is evident within 10 days. Post-operative pain is fairly minimal. The area feels tender for 2-3 days, but the child will be able to eat and function normally. Dr. Randy has performed this procedure on infants as young as two weeks old. Breastfeeding mothers have been able to successfully nurse their infants upon completion of the procedure and many have reported immediate improvements in their child’s ability to nurse.

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Frenectomy Waterlase Laser

Surgically releasing the frenum is called frenectomy. Conventional treatment involved a procedure where the frenum was cut with a blade or scissors, with or without sutures to reposition its attachment. In our office, we employ a procedure called laser frenectomy in which the Waterlase is used to zap the frenum with laser pulses without even touching it, gently severing it from its attachment.

 

A few drops of anesthetic makes the area numb. Healing time is reduced drastically, as the Waterlase does not create tissue trauma or charring, as some older lasers did. The actual procedure takes 3-5 minutes, and full healing with new skin is evident within 10 days. Post-operative pain is fairly minimal. The area feels tender for 2-3 days, but the child will be able to eat and function normally. Dr. Randy has performed this procedure on infants as young as two weeks old. Breastfeeding mothers have been able to successfully nurse their infants upon completion of the procedure and many have reported immediate improvements in their child’s ability to nurse.

Randall J. Pagenkopf, DMD, PA

Partnering with Parents to Create a Lifetime of Healthy Dental Habits